Accession: 226.37.004
Editorial Title: Fanny McNeil Potter to Mary Baker Eddy, March 12, 1882
Author: Fanny McNeil Potter 
Recipient: Mary Baker Eddy 
Date: March 12, 1882
Manuscript Description: Handwritten by Fanny McNeil Potter on unlined paper.
Final Edits
Original Document

226.37.004
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I was delighted to hear from you my darling friend. I have missed you sadly. I am thankful to say my eye is improving, I think under your care for me. How I appreciate all thy tenderness, "I need it, I need it every day & hour"Editorial Note: This is an allusion to the hymn "I Need Thee every hour," with words by Annie Sherwood Hawks (1836 - 1918) and music by Robert Lowry (1826 - 1899).. I was obliged to occupy the sitting room two nights on account of washing of my room & bed with strong Carbolic

I tried to make a quiet change but finding a scene in store for me decided to "Suffer, & feel strong." I hope to leave soon. I think West for a short time, then to N.Y. I met our "English friend" at the "White House." He spoke & we had quite an interview. I will tell you all when we meet. I hope you are succeeding. I presume you are well. I infer your students have each spoken for themselves, & I am the last, but I trust not least among them, my love though quiet, is strong, & deep dear one for you. I quite long for a meeting with you under brighter circumstances. What a winter I have passed, & for What? With much love & a kiss for your dearself & kind regards for your husband I remain as ever Truly Yrs & Lovingly

226.37.004
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I was delighted to hear from you my darling friend. I have missed you sadly. I am thankful to say my eye is improving, I think under your care for me. How I appreciate all thy tenderness, "I need it, I need it every day & hour"Editorial Note: This is an allusion to the hymn "I Need Thee every hour," with words by Annie Sherwood Hawks (1836 - 1918) and music by Robert Lowry (1826 - 1899).. I was obliged to occupy the sitting room two nights on account of washing of my room & bed with strong Carbolic

I tried to make a quiet change but finding a scene in store for me decided to "Suffer, & feel strong." I hope to leave soon. I think West for a short time, then to N.Y. I met our "English friend" at the "White House." He spoke & we had quite an interview. I will tell you all when we meet. I hope you are succeeding. I presume you are well. I infer your students have each spoken for themselves, & I am the last, but I trust not least among them, my love though quiet, is strong, & deep dear one for you. I quite long for a meeting with you under brighter circumstances. What a winter I have passed, & for What? With much love & a kiss for your dearself & kind regards for your husband I remain as ever Truly Yrs & Lovingly