Accession: A10622
Editorial Title: How to be healthy and Happy
Author: Mary Baker Eddy 
Date: April 13, 1879
Manuscript Description: This manuscript was handwritten by Mary Baker Eddy.
Editorial Note: Mary Baker Eddy gave this address at Parker Fraternity Hall.
Final Edits
Original Document

A10622
-
How to be healthy and Happy

'Tis greatly wise to talk with our etcEditorial Note: The complete line from Night Thoughts by poet Edward Young (1683-1765) reads, “'Tis greatly wise to talk with our past hours, And ask them what report they bore to heaven.”

We have talked with you for many Sabbaths but the under standing of Metaphysical healing is gained only through our system of lessons and recitations that is the door through which we enter into this sanctuary of Truth We can only give you its outlines in lectures where we see you but once a week The lectures would be comical that must contain the same statements repeatedAs Written:repeatted every Sabbath because you had forgotten them through the week and learning means memorizing and beginningAs Written:begining where we leave off until one thing at a time is digested and understood In our Lecture we have explained God., The Immortal and Mortal Mind, The unconscious Thought, Personal sense, Identity.

Close

We meet we commune together we part each one to their separate field of labor every one to write his own history A classic hath said at fifty man chides his delay and pushes his prudent purpose to resolveEditorial Note: “At thirty, man suspects himself a fool; Knows it at forty, and reforms his plan; At fifty, chides his infamous delay, Pushes his prudent purpose to resolve.”, Edward Young, Night Thoughts. There are periods in our experience that are pivots our histories turn upon

Is not this one of them? we have sown in your thoughts the seeds seed that bears immortal fruitage And when the germs appear pluck it them not up to see if they have taken root, to question the culture, or to judge of the seed; let the seed lie still in its warm bed for thought to review it lovingly even as the sunbeams glide gently over the grass and the modest violet that beautiful blond among flowers that lifts her blue eye to the light when spring time cometh. Until the new thought which when sown is the least among others ripen spring into life unfold in beauty ripen into action and reachesAs Written:reachs its native paradise to become a tree of Life

A10622
-
How to be healthy and Happy

'Tis greatly wise to talk with our etcEditorial Note: The complete line from Night Thoughts by poet Edward Young (1683-1765) reads, “'Tis greatly wise to talk with our past hours, And ask them what report they bore to heaven.”

We have talked with you for many Sabbaths but the under God standing of Metaphysical healing is gained only through our system of lessons and recitations that is the door through which we enter into this sanctuary of Truth For We can only give you its outlines in lectures where we see you but once a week The lectures would be comical that must contain the same statements repeattedCorrected:repeated every Sabbath because you had forgotten them through the week and learning means memorizing and beginingCorrected:beginning where we leave off until one thing at a time is digested and understood In our Lecture we have endeavored to explain explained God., The Immortal and Mortal Mind, The unconscious Thought, Personal sense, Identity. And will

Close

We meet we commune together we part each one to their separate field of labor every one to write his own history A classic hath said at fifty man chides his infamous delay and pushes his prudent purpose to resolveEditorial Note: “At thirty, man suspects himself a fool; Knows it at forty, and reforms his plan; At fifty, chides his infamous delay, Pushes his prudent purpose to resolve.”, Edward Young, Night Thoughts. There are periods in our experience that are pivotal our history turns upon them pivots our histories turn upon

Is not Is not this one of them? Have we have not sown in your thoughts the seeds seed that bears immortal fruitage Then pluck not up their germs that shall spring up to see if they And when their the germs appear pluck it them not up to see if it hath they have taken root, to question the culture, or to judge of the seed; let them lie still in their warm bed and thought review them quietly lovingly and gently even let the seed lie still in its warm bed for thought to review it lovingly even as as the sunbeams glides glide gently over the grass and the dear Father brings forth the modest violet that beautiful blond among flowers that lifts her blue eye to the light when spring time cometh. Let Until the new thought which when sown is the least among others ripen spring into life unfold in beauty and ripen into action and and reachsCorrected:reaches its native paradise to become a tree of Life