Accession: L07361
Editorial Title: Mary Baker Eddy to Calvin A. Frye, 1882
Author: Mary Baker Eddy 
Recipient: Calvin A. Frye 
Date: 1882 - archivist estimate
Manuscript Description: Handwritten by Mary Baker Eddy on unlined paper.
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L07361
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Reproduced from the archive of The Mary Baker Eddy Library
Dr.Editorial Note: Calvin A. Frye did not have a medical degree, but in the nineteenth century, persons engaged in various “healing arts” were often called “doctor.” Frye
Dear Student

While writing to the dear ones in Boston it occurred As Written: occured to me there were other students in LawrenceEditorial Note: Lawrence, Massachusetts to whom my thoughts and prayers turned as well for their prosperity and progress So I address you as one to communicate with the others, give them my love and an encouraging word to press on in the line of light and duty.

Jesus said, " My yoke is easy and my burden is lightMatt 11:28 ¶Come unto me, all ye that labour and are heavy laden, and I will give you rest. Matt 11:29 Take my yoke upon you, and learn of me; for I am meek and lowly in heart: and ye shall find rest unto your souls. Matt 11:30 For my yoke is easy, and my burden is light. " If " the man of sorrowsIsa 53:3 He is despised and rejected of men; a man of sorrows, and acquainted with grief: and we hid as it were our faces from him; he was despised, and we esteemed him not. " so construed his lifework, let us never murmur, but gather fresh courage and consolation in the struggle with the world the fleshEditorial Note: The phrase "the world, the flesh, and the devil" has often been used by Christians to indicate three basic errors that a Christian is to overcome. It is not a statement found specifically in the Bible. and demonology. I find there is a sure way of triumph over it all and those who follow me will certainly find it also. Our masterEditorial Note: Jesus Christ bade us come unto him when weary and heavy ladenMatt 11:28 ¶Come unto me, all ye that labour and are heavy laden, and I will give you rest. Matt 11:29 Take my yoke upon you, and learn of me; for I am meek and lowly in heart: and ye shall find rest unto your souls. Matt 11:30 For my yoke is easy, and my burden is light. O how sweet the thought that we can come and find peaceEditorial Note: This phrase may echo a poem by Felicia Hemans (1793-1835) titled, The Angel’s Greeting. Its first line is "Come to the land of peace." in the fullness of
Where no arrow wounds the dove
Where no partings are for love
Where are no rough seas of foam
Where joy dwells and is at home
Editorial Note: These lines are derived from the third stanza of a poem by Mary Anne Tripp, "Where is Home?" It was published on pages 450, 451 of her 1835 book, The Songs of La Colonna. It was also published on page 215 of The Ladies' Pearl: A Monthly Magazine, February 1841, Volume 1, No. 9. The original stanza reads: "Where no arrow wounds the dove, / Where no parting is for love, / Where are no rough seas of foam, / Where joy dwelleth, there is Home!"

My present P.O. address is Barton VtEditorial Note: Mary Baker Eddy spent some time during the summer of 1882 in Barton, Vermont, following the death of her husband, Asa Gilbert Eddy on June 3, 1882. care of J.C. Buswell Esqr. When I left Boston I took with me for a companion my little Alice Sibley and she has proven a very pleasant one

The tour so far has been delightful filled as the picture is with earth's finest views among the rock-ribbed As Written: rock-ribed rest of the sheltering hills, over the green quiet valleys As Written: valeys, along the still watersPs 23:1 The Lord is my shepherd; I shall not want. Ps 23:2 He maketh me to lie down in green pastures: he leadeth me beside the still waters. , and finally terminating in a short stop with two of the kindest of the human family — a country farmer and his wife

Ever truly
Mary B.G. Eddy
L07361
-
Reproduced from the archive of The Mary Baker Eddy Library
Dr.Editorial Note: Calvin A. Frye did not have a medical degree, but in the nineteenth century, persons engaged in various “healing arts” were often called “doctor.” Frye
Dear Student

While writing to the dear ones in Boston it occured Corrected: occurred to me there were other students in LawrenceEditorial Note: Lawrence, Massachusetts to whom my thoughts and prayers turned as well for their prosperity and progress So I address you as one to communicate with the others, give them my love and an encouraging word to press on in the line of light and duty.

Jesus said, " My yoke is easy and my burden is lightMatt 11:28 ¶Come unto me, all ye that labour and are heavy laden, and I will give you rest. Matt 11:29 Take my yoke upon you, and learn of me; for I am meek and lowly in heart: and ye shall find rest unto your souls. Matt 11:30 For my yoke is easy, and my burden is light. " If " the man of sorrowsIsa 53:3 He is despised and rejected of men; a man of sorrows, and acquainted with grief: and we hid as it were our faces from him; he was despised, and we esteemed him not. " so construed his lifework, let us never murmur, but gather fresh courage and consolation in the struggle with the world the fleshEditorial Note: The phrase "the world, the flesh, and the devil" has often been used by Christians to indicate three basic errors that a Christian is to overcome. It is not a statement found specifically in the Bible. and demonology. I find there is a sure way of triumph over it all and those who follow me will certainly find it also. Our masterEditorial Note: Jesus Christ bade us come unto him when weary and heavy ladenMatt 11:28 ¶Come unto me, all ye that labour and are heavy laden, and I will give you rest. Matt 11:29 Take my yoke upon you, and learn of me; for I am meek and lowly in heart: and ye shall find rest unto your souls. Matt 11:30 For my yoke is easy, and my burden is light. O how sweet the thought that we can come and find peaceEditorial Note: This phrase may echo a poem by Felicia Hemans (1793-1835) titled, The Angel’s Greeting. Its first line is "Come to the land of peace." in the fullness of
Where no arrow wounds the dove
Where no partings are for love
Where are no rough seas of foam
Where joy dwells and is at home
Editorial Note: These lines are derived from the third stanza of a poem by Mary Anne Tripp, "Where is Home?" It was published on pages 450, 451 of her 1835 book, The Songs of La Colonna. It was also published on page 215 of The Ladies' Pearl: A Monthly Magazine, February 1841, Volume 1, No. 9. The original stanza reads: "Where no arrow wounds the dove, / Where no parting is for love, / Where are no rough seas of foam, / Where joy dwelleth, there is Home!"

My present P.O. address is Barton VtEditorial Note: Mary Baker Eddy spent some time during the summer of 1882 in Barton, Vermont, following the death of her husband, Asa Gilbert Eddy on June 3, 1882. care of J.C. Buswell Esqr. When I left Boston I took with me for a companion my little Alice Sibley and she has proven a very pleasant one

The tour so far has been delightful filled as the picture is with earth's finest views among the rock-ribed Corrected: rock-ribbed rest of the sheltering hills, over the green quiet valeys, Corrected: valleys along the still watersPs 23:1 The Lord is my shepherd; I shall not want. Ps 23:2 He maketh me to lie down in green pastures: he leadeth me beside the still waters. , and finally terminating in a short stop with two of the kindest of the human family — a country farmer and his wife

Ever truly
Mary B.G. Eddy
 
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Calvin A. Frye did not have a medical degree, but in the nineteenth century, persons engaged in various “healing arts” were often called “doctor.” Lawrence, Massachusetts The phrase "the world, the flesh, and the devil" has often been used by Christians to indicate three basic errors that a Christian is to overcome. It is not a statement found specifically in the Bible. Jesus Christ This phrase may echo a poem by Felicia Hemans (1793-1835) titled, The Angel’s Greeting. Its first line is "Come to the land of peace." These lines are derived from the third stanza of a poem by Mary Anne Tripp, "Where is Home?" It was published on pages 450, 451 of her 1835 book, The Songs of La Colonna. It was also published on page 215 of The Ladies' Pearl: A Monthly Magazine, February 1841, Volume 1, No. 9. The original stanza reads: "Where no arrow wounds the dove, / Where no parting is for love, / Where are no rough seas of foam, / Where joy dwelleth, there is Home!" Mary Baker Eddy spent some time during the summer of 1882 in Barton, Vermont, following the death of her husband, Asa Gilbert Eddy on June 3, 1882.