Accession: L07648
Editorial Title: Mary Baker Eddy to Hattie Baker, 1875
Author: Mary Baker Eddy 
Recipient: Hattie Baker 
Date: 1875 - archivist estimate
Manuscript Description: Handwritten by Mary Baker Eddy.
Final Edits
Original Document

L07648
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Dear Cousin,

After "the long weary day" I sit to write you a line in reply to your kind thoughts of me last evening. I was sensible of my students thinking of me in the right way and you was one of them. Accept my thanks for every effort and memory scientific, and rest assured I "miss you at home"

Yes Hattie, dear, there was seed sown on that rock that will bear fruit in time or eternity

But I thought of the words of our dear Master "Who hath touched me for he felt that strength had gone out of himLuke 8:46 And Jesus said, Somebody hath touched me: for I perceive that virtue is gone out of me. "

That however was but the human, the divine was not weakened and we should hush such human utterance as the lie of personal sense. Was not that man stirred to the foundations? He was somewhat interesting after all. Hattie you heard what Mr. Williams or Mr Putnam said "Behold the fields are white for the harvest but the laborers are fewJohn 4:35 Say not ye, There are yet four months, and then cometh harvest? behold, I say unto you, Lift up your eyes, and look on the fields; for they are white already to harvest. Matt 9:37 Then saith he unto his disciples, The harvest truly is plenteous, but the labourers are few; Luke 10:2 Therefore said he unto them, The harvest truly is great, but the labourers are few: pray ye therefore the Lord of the harvest, that he would send forth labourers into his harvest. " Will you write your sister for me and ask her if she can help me a day on my dress next week?

How nice she did up the dinner. I "should love to steal awhile away from every cumbring careEditorial Note: The line, "I love to steal awhile away/ From every cumb'ring care/ And spend the hours of setting day/ In humble, grateful prayer," is from a hymn by Phoebe Brown." and just run into Boston for a few days and have such delicious chats with Mrs F.Editorial Note: This may be a reference to Sarah Frothingham. and cousin Hattie, but think I will wait until the Dr. (Spofford) returns, he went away to-day, it is lonely, but beautiful here. I have no doubt you improved the time before I arrived; what of Miss McLane? I hope she is comforted. Give much love to Mrs. Frothingham and respects to her kind husband and say to the former her letter is next in order and I will not forget it

Yours lovingly
MMBG
L07648
-
Dear Cousin,

After "the long weary day" I sit to write you a line in reply to your kind thoughts of me last evening. I was sensible of my students thinking of me in the right way and you was one of them. Accept my thanks for every effort and memory scientific, and rest assured I they "miss you at home"

Yes Hattie, dear, there was seed sown on that rock that will bear fruit in time or eternity

But I thought of the words of our dear Master "Who hath touched me for he felt that strength had gone out of himLuke 8:46 And Jesus said, Somebody hath touched me: for I perceive that virtue is gone out of me. "

That however was but the human, the divine was not weakened and we should hush such a human utterance as the lie of personal sense. Was not that man stirred to the foundations? He was somewhat interesting after all. Hattie you heard what Mr. Williams or Mr Putnam said "Behold the fields are white for the harvest but the laborers are fewJohn 4:35 Say not ye, There are yet four months, and then cometh harvest? behold, I say unto you, Lift up your eyes, and look on the fields; for they are white already to harvest. Matt 9:37 Then saith he unto his disciples, The harvest truly is plenteous, but the labourers are few; Luke 10:2 Therefore said he unto them, The harvest truly is great, but the labourers are few: pray ye therefore the Lord of the harvest, that he would send forth labourers into his harvest. " Will you write your sister for me and ask her if she can help me a day on my dress next week?

How nice she did up the dinner. I "should love to steal awhile away from every cumbring careEditorial Note: The line, "I love to steal awhile away/ From every cumb'ring care/ And spend the hours of setting day/ In humble, grateful prayer," is from a hymn by Phoebe Brown." and just run into Boston for a few days and have such delicious chats with Mrs F.Editorial Note: This may be a reference to Sarah Frothingham. and cousin Hattie, but think I will wait until the Dr. (Spofford) returns, he went away to-day, it is lonely, but beautiful here. I have no doubt you improved the time before I arrived; what of Miss McLane? I hope she is comforted. Give much love to Mrs. Frothingham and respects to her kind husband and say to the former her letter is next in order and I will not forget it

Yours lovingly
MMBG