Russell Herman Conwell
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Russell H. Conwell (1843-1925) was a lawyer and Baptist minister, born in Worthington, Massachusetts. After attending the Wesleyan Academy in Wilbraham, Massachusetts, he enrolled at Yale University. Before graduating, however, he enlisted in the Union Army, serving first as a captain in Company F, Forty-sixth Massachusetts Volunteer Militia and then reenlisting in Company D, Second Regiment, Massachusetts Heavy Artillery. After the Civil War, he completed his law degree at the University of Albany, New York. In 1878, he represented Asa G. Eddy and Edward J. Arens during legal proceedings, when the two were accused of the attempted murder of Daniel H. Spofford; the charges were eventually dropped. In 1879, he was ordained as a Baptist minister and in 1882 became pastor of Grace Baptist Church in Philadelphia. In 1884, he founded Temple College (today known as Temple University) and in 1887 was elected Temple's first president, serving until his death in 1925. He is still known today for his lecture "Acres of Diamonds," which he delivered over six thousand times.
Russell Herman Conwell
R00011R00011
Russell H. Conwell (1843-1925) was a lawyer and Baptist minister, born in Worthington, Massachusetts. After attending the Wesleyan Academy in Wilbraham, Massachusetts, he enrolled at Yale University. Before graduating, however, he enlisted in the Union Army, serving first as a captain in Company F, Forty-sixth Massachusetts Volunteer Militia and then reenlisting in Company D, Second Regiment, Massachusetts Heavy Artillery. After the Civil War, he completed his law degree at the University of Albany, New York. In 1878, he represented Asa G. Eddy and Edward J. Arens during legal proceedings, when the two were accused of the attempted murder of Daniel H. Spofford; the charges were eventually dropped. In 1879, he was ordained as a Baptist minister and in 1882 became pastor of Grace Baptist Church in Philadelphia. In 1884, he founded Temple College (today known as Temple University) and in 1887 was elected Temple's first president, serving until his death in 1925. He is still known today for his lecture "Acres of Diamonds," which he delivered over six thousand times.