Laura C. Holloway
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Laura C. Holloway (later Laura C. Langford) (1843-1930) was born in Nashville, Tennessee, and died in Canaan, New York. She was a journalist, author, and Theosophist. In 1862, she married Union Army Lieutenant Junius Holloway, with whom she had a son, George. Shortly after the Civil War, her marriage to Holloway was dissolved, and along with her son and parents, she moved to Brooklyn, New York. In the late 1860s, she began working as a reporter for the Brooklyn Daily Eagle and, in 1870, was promoted to the position of associate editor. During the same year, she published her most famous work, The Ladies of the White House, which is estimated to have sold over 100,000 copies, making her independently wealthy. Holloway became interested in Theosophy in the late 1870s and, in 1884, spent six months in Europe where she met and worked with Theosophists, including Helena Petrovna Blavatsky, the leader of the Theosophical movement. In 1890, she married Edward L. Langford, a businessman active in New York politics. After his death in 1902, Holloway moved to Canaan, New York, and lived on a farm she had purchased from the local Shaker community. She continued her work as an author until her passing. There is no record of Holloway studying with Mary Baker Eddy or uniting with the Church of Christ (Scientist).
Laura C. Holloway
No Image
Laura C. Holloway (later Laura C. Langford) (1843-1930) was born in Nashville, Tennessee, and died in Canaan, New York. She was a journalist, author, and Theosophist. In 1862, she married Union Army Lieutenant Junius Holloway, with whom she had a son, George. Shortly after the Civil War, her marriage to Holloway was dissolved, and along with her son and parents, she moved to Brooklyn, New York. In the late 1860s, she began working as a reporter for the Brooklyn Daily Eagle and, in 1870, was promoted to the position of associate editor. During the same year, she published her most famous work, The Ladies of the White House, which is estimated to have sold over 100,000 copies, making her independently wealthy. Holloway became interested in Theosophy in the late 1870s and, in 1884, spent six months in Europe where she met and worked with Theosophists, including Helena Petrovna Blavatsky, the leader of the Theosophical movement. In 1890, she married Edward L. Langford, a businessman active in New York politics. After his death in 1902, Holloway moved to Canaan, New York, and lived on a farm she had purchased from the local Shaker community. She continued her work as an author until her passing. There is no record of Holloway studying with Mary Baker Eddy or uniting with the Church of Christ (Scientist).