Emma Curtis Hopkins
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Emma Curtis Hopkins (1849-1925) was born and died in Killingly, Connecticut. She was a student of Mary Baker Eddy's, taking Primary class instruction in December 1883. Hopkins joined the Christian Scientist Association (CSA) in 1884 and was briefly the acting editor of The Christian Science Journal. In November 1885, she resigned from the CSA and later formed the Emma Hopkins College of Metaphysical Science in Chicago. She became a leading teacher of New Thought, the diverse and loosely organized mind-healing movement that included many influences such as Eastern religions and philosophies. Her most successful book, High Mysticism, was published in 1896. Her husband, George Irving Hopkins (m. 1874), divorced her in 1900 on grounds of abandonment.
Emma Curtis Hopkins
P04935cP04935c
Emma Curtis Hopkins (1849-1925) was born and died in Killingly, Connecticut. She was a student of Mary Baker Eddy's, taking Primary class instruction in December 1883. Hopkins joined the Christian Scientist Association (CSA) in 1884 and was briefly the acting editor of The Christian Science Journal. In November 1885, she resigned from the CSA and later formed the Emma Hopkins College of Metaphysical Science in Chicago. She became a leading teacher of New Thought, the diverse and loosely organized mind-healing movement that included many influences such as Eastern religions and philosophies. Her most successful book, High Mysticism, was published in 1896. Her husband, George Irving Hopkins (m. 1874), divorced her in 1900 on grounds of abandonment.