Hanover P. Smith
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Hanover P. Smith (1861-1916), who was sometimes referred to as "Peter," was born in Wilton, Maine, and died in Cincinnati, Ohio. He first met Mary Baker Eddy in about 1879 when his mother, Susan R. Smith, brought him to see Eddy. On that visit, Eddy healed him of being deaf and mute. In 1880, in May and February respectively, both Hanover and his mother took Primary class instruction from Eddy. He served as clerk of the Church of Christ (Scientist) from December 1881 until December 1882, briefly living at the Massachusetts Metaphysical College on Boston's Columbus Avenue during the spring and summer of that year. In 1887, he published Writings and Genius of the Founder of Christian Science, a pamphlet funded by Eddy. Correspondence suggests he had stopped attending church services in 1891 before moving to London, Ontario. He returned to Boston in 1894 and, from that point on, began suffering from mental health problems that would ultimately lead to his commitment at the Longview State Hospital, Cincinnati, Ohio, in 1900. He remained there until his passing sixteen years later.
Hanover P. Smith
P04935aP04935a
Hanover P. Smith (1861-1916), who was sometimes referred to as "Peter," was born in Wilton, Maine, and died in Cincinnati, Ohio. He first met Mary Baker Eddy in about 1879 when his mother, Susan R. Smith, brought him to see Eddy. On that visit, Eddy healed him of being deaf and mute. In 1880, in May and February respectively, both Hanover and his mother took Primary class instruction from Eddy. He served as clerk of the Church of Christ (Scientist) from December 1881 until December 1882, briefly living at the Massachusetts Metaphysical College on Boston's Columbus Avenue during the spring and summer of that year. In 1887, he published Writings and Genius of the Founder of Christian Science, a pamphlet funded by Eddy. Correspondence suggests he had stopped attending church services in 1891 before moving to London, Ontario. He returned to Boston in 1894 and, from that point on, began suffering from mental health problems that would ultimately lead to his commitment at the Longview State Hospital, Cincinnati, Ohio, in 1900. He remained there until his passing sixteen years later.