Arabella H. Tucker
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Arabella H. Tucker (1857-1936) was born in North Brookfield, Massachusetts, and died in Auburn, Massachusetts. Tucker was an educator, suffragist, and author. She was a member of the inaugural class of the Massachusetts State Normal School at Worcester (now Worcester State University). After graduation, she taught in North Brookfield until 1878, when she began teaching at the Thomas Street School in Worcester. In the summer of 1885, she took a special course at Cornell University, and later, in 1895, she took a course in botany at Harvard University. In 1888, she was appointed to the faculty of the Normal School at Worcester, lecturing on botany and rural education. She would teach at the school until her retirement in 1917. While on the faculty of the Normal School at Worcester, she was active in the women's rights movement as a member of the Worcester Equal Franchise Club and as a member, and then president, of the Worcester Woman's Club. Despite expressing an interest in Christian Science treatment through prayer, there is no record of her studying with or being treated by Mary Baker Eddy.
Arabella H. Tucker
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Arabella H. Tucker (1857-1936) was born in North Brookfield, Massachusetts, and died in Auburn, Massachusetts. Tucker was an educator, suffragist, and author. She was a member of the inaugural class of the Massachusetts State Normal School at Worcester (now Worcester State University). After graduation, she taught in North Brookfield until 1878, when she began teaching at the Thomas Street School in Worcester. In the summer of 1885, she took a special course at Cornell University, and later, in 1895, she took a course in botany at Harvard University. In 1888, she was appointed to the faculty of the Normal School at Worcester, lecturing on botany and rural education. She would teach at the school until her retirement in 1917. While on the faculty of the Normal School at Worcester, she was active in the women's rights movement as a member of the Worcester Equal Franchise Club and as a member, and then president, of the Worcester Woman's Club. Despite expressing an interest in Christian Science treatment through prayer, there is no record of her studying with or being treated by Mary Baker Eddy.