Accession: A10219
Editorial Title: Mary Baker Eddy "Biography," 1903
Author: Mary Baker Eddy 
Annotator: Mary Baker Eddy  Calvin A. Frye 
Date: 1903 - archivist estimate
Manuscript Description: Typewritten with edits and corrections in the handwriting of Mary Baker Eddy and Calvin A. Frye.
Archival Note: The date of this document is an archivist estimate.
Editorial Note: This document was written after Mary Baker Eddy joined the Daughters of the American Revolution, the Victoria Institute, and the Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Children. Its content appears to be related to Henry Robinson’s A Biographical Sketch of Rev. Mary Baker G. Eddy, which dates to about 1903. It is also similar to L18363, which is dated June 4, 1903.
Related Topic: 653.68.026Click link to view 653.68.026 document in new window, L02683Click link to view L02683 document in new window, V03472Click link to view V03472 document in new window, L18363Digital document L18363 not available
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A10219
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Reproduced from the archive of The Mary Baker Eddy Library

Biography.

The principal teachers whose schools I attended were Miss Sarah Bodwell principal of Ipswich Seminary [*]Editorial Note: Mary Baker Eddy corrects this statement in L18363, as well as on page 304 of The First Church of Christ, Scientist, and Miscellany (1908) and in a letter titled "A Misstatement Corrected", which was published in the Boston Journal on June 8, 1903: "I was early a pupil of Miss Sarah J. Bodwell, the principal of Sanbornton Academy, New Hampshire…" Mr. Courser principal of Sanbornton Bridge Academy Albert Baker graduate of Dartmouth College Prof. Dyer H. Sanborn author of Sanborn's Grammer. Some of my studies were natural philosophyEditorial Note: Natural Philosophy was a term used from ancient times into the nineteenth century for the study of the natural world. It embraced such topics as biology, chemistry, and physics., chemistry, astronomy, Watts "On the Mind"Editorial Note: The Improvement of the Mind by Isaac Watts D.D., Blair's RhetoricEditorial Note: Lectures on Rhetoric and Belles Lettres by Hugh Blair Whateley's LogicEditorial Note: Elements of Logic by Richard Whately, Moral Science, Lock'sEditorial Note: John Locke (1632-1704) metaphysics, a smattering of Latin, French, Greek and Hebrew.

My first attempt at measured lines was "Autumn"Editorial Note: This poem appeared on page 400 of the November 1888 issue of The Christian Science Journal, and later on pages 395-396 of Mary Baker Eddy’s book, Miscellaneous Writings 1883-1896., Written in childhood.

When receiving my second lesson in drawing the teacher said somewhat sternly "I understood you to say you had never before taken lessons in drawing" I replied ingenuously "I never have". He gave me one more lesson then kindly said "now go on alone, you need no further instruction."

I United with the Congregational Trinitarian Church at about twelve years of age remained in that church till I had a church of my own, the First Church of Christ, Scientist.

Commenced writing for newspapers at about sixteen years of age. Wrote many years under various nom de plumes for the leading Magazines in the North and South.

Was married young in my father's house at Tilton, New HampshireAs Written:N.H. To Col. George W. Glover a resident of Charleston, South Carolina. My anti-slavery articles that appeared in the South in newspapers under a male signature created such excitement in North Carolina that placards were posted offering premiums for the detection of their author.

On returning to the North I introduced the Southern system of infant schools and became the first teacher of that school which has since merged into the Kindergarten. Was privately and publicly profusely complimented on the training of children

Studied Homeopathy did not receive a diploma timidity prevented my entering a dissecting room. No woman had then been admitted member of the medical society. PracticedAs Written:Practised medicine several years before discovering Christian Science, or metaphysical healing.

When the civil war broke out between the North and South I took a public stand for abolishing slavery. I obtained a long list of female petitioners and sent it to Gen Benjamin F. Butler beseeching him to make the loyal southern slave a contraband of war. His aide As Written: aid de camp replied "the Gen. believes that with the aid of such women the war would soon be over". [*]Archival Note: The following text was later added to the document by the author, disrupting the surrounding thought. BiographicalAs Written:Biog. Sketch of Christian ScienceAs Written:C. S.? [*]Archival Note: End floating text.

Am a Life Member and Associate of the "Victoria Institute," London, EnglandAs Written:Eng. A Life Member of "The Daughters of the American Revolution," Washington D. C. A life member of the Society for "Prevention of Cruelty to Children," Boston, MassachusettsAs Written:Mass a member of Mr. Anthony Comstock's society for "The Suppression of Vice," in New York. [*]Archival Note: There is a crossed out paragraph mark here.

My brother delivered the first Temperance lecture and drew up the first [*]Archival Note: There is a transpose editing mark here. Temperance pledge in the state of New Hampshire. I signed it, and while a member of the Good Templars in Lynn, MassachusettsAs Written:Mass. reformed many drunkards, and rescued the Woman's Branch of The Temple of Honor from a complete wreck, and one year, added to its number seventy-five members.

Return to me this copy

M B E

A10219
-
Reproduced from the archive of The Mary Baker Eddy Library

Biography.

The principal teachers whose schools I attended were Miss Sarah Bodwell principal of Ipswich Seminary [*]Editorial Note: Mary Baker Eddy corrects this statement in L18363, as well as on page 304 of The First Church of Christ, Scientist, and Miscellany (1908) and in a letter titled "A Misstatement Corrected", which was published in the Boston Journal on June 8, 1903: "I was early a pupil of Miss Sarah J. Bodwell, the principal of Sanbornton Academy, New Hampshire…" Mr. Courser principal of Sanbornton Bridge Academy Albert Baker y graduate of Dartmouth College Prof. Dyer H. Sanborn author of Sanborn's Grammer. Some otf my studies were natural philosophyEditorial Note: Natural Philosophy was a term used from ancient times into the nineteenth century for the study of the natural world. It embraced such topics as biology, chemistry, and physics., chemistry, astronomy, Watts "On the Mind"Editorial Note: The Improvement of the Mind by Isaac Watts D.D., Blair's RhetoricEditorial Note: Lectures on Rhetoric and Belles Lettres by Hugh Blair Whateley's LogicEditorial Note: Elements of Logic by Richard Whately, Moral Science, Lock'sEditorial Note: John Locke (1632-1704) metaphysics, a smattering of Latin, French, Greek and Hebrew.

My first attempt at measured lines was "Autumn"Editorial Note: This poem appeared on page 400 of the November 1888 issue of The Christian Science Journal, and later on pages 395-396 of Mary Baker Eddy’s book, Miscellaneous Writings 1883-1896., Written in childhood.

When receiving my second lesson in drawing the teacher said somewhat sternly "I understood you to say you had never before taken lessons in drawing" I replied ingenuously "I never hadve". He gave me one more [?] Unclear or illegible  lesson. then kindly said "now go on alone, you need no further instruction."

I United with the Congregational Trinitarian Church at about twelve years of age remained in that church till I had a church of my own, the Frirst Church of Christ, Scientist.

Commenced writing for newspapers at about sixteen years of age. Wrote many years under various nom de plumes for the leading Magazines in the North and South.

Was married young in my father's house at Tilton, N.H.Expanded:New Hampshire To Col. George W. Glover a resident of Charleston, South Carolina. My anti-slavery at articles that appeared in the South in newspapers under a male signature created such excitement in North Carolina that placards were posted offering premiums for the detection of their author.

On returning to the North I introduced the Southern system of infant shchools and became the first teacher of that school which has since merged into the ZKindergarten. Was privately and publicly warmly profusely complimented on the training of children

Studied Homeopathy did not receive a diploma timidity prevented my entering a dissecting room. No woman had then been admitted member of the medical society. PractisedCorrected:Practiced medicine several years before discovering Christian Science, or metaphysical healing.

When the civil war broke out between the North and South I took a public stand for abolishing slavery. I obtained a long list of female petitioners and sent it to Gen Benjamin F. Butler beseeching him to make the loyal southern slave a contraband of [?] Unclear or illegible  war. His aid Corrected: aide de camp replied "the Gen. believes that with the aid of such women the war would soon be over". [*]Archival Note: The following text was later added to the document by the author, disrupting the surrounding thought. Biog.Expanded:Biographical Sketch of C. S.Expanded:Christian Science? [*]Archival Note: End floating text.

Am a Life Member and Associate of the "Victoria Institute," London, Eng.Expanded:England A Life Member of "The Daughters of the American Revolution," Washington D. C. a A life member of the Society for "Prevention of Cruelty to Children," Boston, MassExpanded:Massachusetts a member of Mr. Anthony Comstock's society for "The Suppression of Vice," in New York. [*]Archival Note: There is a crossed out paragraph mark here.

My brother delivered the first Tempereance lecture and drew up the first [*]Archival Note: There is a transpose editing mark here. Tempereance pledge on in the state of New Hampshire. I signed it, and while a member of the Good Templars in Lynn, Mass.Expanded:Massachusetts reformed many drunkards, and rescued the Woman's Branch of The Temple of Honor from a complete wreck, and added to it in one year, while I was its President, added to its number seventy-five [?] Unclear or illegible  members.

Return to me this copy

M B E

 
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Mary Baker Eddy corrects this statement in L18363, as well as on page 304 of The First Church of Christ, Scientist, and Miscellany (1908) and in a letter titled "A Misstatement Corrected", which was published in the Boston Journal on June 8, 1903: "I was early a pupil of Miss Sarah J. Bodwell, the principal of Sanbornton Academy, New Hampshire…" Natural Philosophy was a term used from ancient times into the nineteenth century for the study of the natural world. It embraced such topics as biology, chemistry, and physics. The Improvement of the Mind by Isaac Watts D.D. Lectures on Rhetoric and Belles Lettres by Hugh Blair Elements of Logic by Richard Whately John Locke (1632-1704) This poem appeared on page 400 of the November 1888 issue of The Christian Science Journal, and later on pages 395-396 of Mary Baker Eddy’s book, Miscellaneous Writings 1883-1896. The following text was later added to the document by the author, disrupting the surrounding thought. End floating text. There is a crossed out paragraph mark here. There is a transpose editing mark here.