Accession: L10640
Editorial Title: Mary Baker Eddy to James Ackland, September 22, 1880
Author: Mary Baker Eddy 
Recipient: James Ackland 
Date: September 22, 1880 - archivist estimate
Manuscript Description: Handwritten by Mary Baker Eddy from Lynn, Massachusetts.
Related Topic: 146.23.004Click link to view 146.23.004 document in new window
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Original Document

L10640
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I was pleased to hear from youEditorial Note: Ackland had written to Mary Baker Eddy on September 13, 1880. See 146.23.004. and should be delighted to see you and the lady friendEditorial Note: In his letter to Mary Baker Eddy of September 30, 1880 (146.23.004), Ackland calls this “lady friend,” “Miss C-----, Tilliola, Tillie, or plain Matilda,” and says he feels she could be a good healer. here on the old spot where you once with mock gravity preached briefly over a box of books. Do you remember? Those pleasant hours we have passed in your company are never to be forgotten by us. When you visit Boston don't fail to call on us. We are hanging yet, neither housekeeping nor boarding, but taking meals out have not unpacked this timeEditorial Note: Mary Baker Eddy and Asa Gilbert Eddy had spent July and August of 1880 in Concord, New Hampshire. Prior to going to Concord they’d been living at 551 Shawmut Avenue in Boston, Massachusetts. In September 1880 they returned to the house owned by Mary Baker Eddy at 8 Broad Street in Lynn, Massachusetts.. Laid a carpet down and took out a desk and a few chairs, only waiting until we sell. Renting will hardly pay as they have used our house since we left it. I have much to tell you about the crimes done in the secret service, especially would I like to tell you about Arens, you can scarcely credit his course. One thing before I forget it, we have thought the contents of our letters have been known by those fellows but could scarcely learn how, but when yours came it was nearly open and I took it from the envelope in just the state it was in without the slighest slightest As Written: slighest change on my part one side was cut open. Now please tell me what you think of this? And O, be careful of the worse robery, robbery As Written: robery, that of our friendship, by those mental criminals, and suffer that never to be. They have robbed me of all my friends in this place pretty much, and now are trying it in the West. The little while we were absent they sent their slanders and foul falsehoods where we were. I shall be pleased to teach the ladyEditorial Note: In his letter to Mary Baker Eddy of September 30, 1880 (146.23.004), Ackland calls this lady “Miss C-----, Tilliola, Tillie, or plain Matilda,” and says he feels she could be a good healer. in question whenever I have the opportunity Love from husband

Truly yours
M B G Eddy
L10640
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I was pleased to hear from youEditorial Note: Ackland had written to Mary Baker Eddy on September 13, 1880. See 146.23.004. and should be delighted to see you and the lady friendEditorial Note: In his letter to Mary Baker Eddy of September 30, 1880 (146.23.004), Ackland calls this “lady friend,” “Miss C-----, Tilliola, Tillie, or plain Matilda,” and says he feels she could be a good healer. here on the old spot where you once with mock gravity preached briefly over a box of books. Do you remember? Those pleasant hours we have passed in your company are never to be forgotten by us. When you visit Boston don't fail to call on us. We are hanging yet, neither housekeeping nor boarding, but taking meals out have not unpacked this timeEditorial Note: Mary Baker Eddy and Asa Gilbert Eddy had spent July and August of 1880 in Concord, New Hampshire. Prior to going to Concord they’d been living at 551 Shawmut Avenue in Boston, Massachusetts. In September 1880 they returned to the house owned by Mary Baker Eddy at 8 Broad Street in Lynn, Massachusetts.. Laid a carpet down and took out a desk and a few chairs, only waiting until we sell. Renting doesnot will hardly pay as they have used our house since we left it. I have much to tell you about the crimes done in the secret service, especially would I like to tell you about Arens, you can scarcely credit his course. One thing before I forget it, we have thought the contents of our letters have been known by those fellows but could scarcely learn how, but when yours came it was nearly open and I took it from the envelope in just the state I return it it was in without the slighest slighest Corrected: slightest change on my part one side was cut open. Now please tell me what you think of this? And O, be careful of the worse robery, robery, Corrected: robbery that of our friendship, by those mental criminals, and suffer that never to be. They have robbed me of all my friends in this place pretty much, and now are trying it in the West. The little while we were absent they sent their slanders and foul falsehoods where we were. I shall be pleased to teach the ladyEditorial Note: In his letter to Mary Baker Eddy of September 30, 1880 (146.23.004), Ackland calls this lady “Miss C-----, Tilliola, Tillie, or plain Matilda,” and says he feels she could be a good healer. in question whenever I have the opportunity Love from husband

Truly yours
M B G Eddy