Accession: L13466
Editorial Title: Mary Baker Eddy to Benjamin F. Atkinson, January 17, 1878
Author: Mary Baker Eddy 
Recipient: Benjamin F. Atkinson 
Date: January 17, 1878
Manuscript Description: Handwritten by Mary Baker Eddy on lined paper.
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Original Document

L13466
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Dear Sir,—

I wish I could converse with you—what a privilege I should esteem it. I have such confidence in your moral status, and excellent judgment As Written: judgement to act in a case so terrible as the one before us. The half is not told, last night and to-day the awful story was again brought to me of three cases turned back from recovery and how despairing they had become all at once. I examined them last evening saw at once it was Spofford, and spoke to him mentally let them alone and just an hour ago I heard from two of them and they were better with every hope and appearance of recovering. We take no other argument now.

The history of what he had done before I discovered it, would startle you, my poor students are like hindsEditorial Note: A hind is a female deer over three years old. upon the mountains, and the beliefs that I deemed impossible to come to me I have continually to meet and ward off with arguments alone that he is uttering. Guard well your own and your dear family's symptomsAs Written:symptons, and when you feel doubts of me, or physical ailments take him up with the contradictions of his arguments and the symptoms will disappear.

I approve of your method because it is best to always try to save a person and to change their evil purpose before exposing it, but you will not succeed, as I have not. Spofford has at my suggestions of pacification asked my husband to forgive him, and then gone right away and committed further wrongs, told more falsehoods, and denied that he ever sought his pardon. He has on his knees implored me to forgive him and yet I knew he was no better at heart when he did this.

You have no conception of his terrible character, the only hope is, he is a coward knowing this of himself, and if you can make him know we will expose him in justice to our cause and professions as Scientists; it may obtain a cessation for us; but he must be put down or we shall be. I will receive the umpire at my house or at yours, but in no other place would it be best

I hope to see you all soon Love to all

And I am ever RespectfullyAs Written:Respect'ly Yours
M B Glover Eddy
L13466
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Dear Sir,—

I wish I could converse with you—what a privilege I should esteem it. I have such confidence in your moral status, and excellent judgement Corrected: judgment to act in a case so terrible as the one before us. The half is not told, last night and to-day the awful story was again brought to me of three cases turned back from recovery and how despairing they had become all at once. I examined them last evening saw at once it was Spofford, and spoke to him mentally let them alone and just an hour ago I heard from two of them and they were better with every hope and appearance of recovering. We take no other argument now.

The history of what he had done before I discovered it, it would startle you, my poor students are like hindsEditorial Note: A hind is a female deer over three years old. upon the mountains, and the beliefs that I deemed impossible to come to me I have continually to meet and ward off with arguments alone that he is uttering. Guard well your own and your dear family's symptonsCorrected:symptoms, and when you feel doubts of me, or physical ailments take him up with the contradictions of his arguments and the symptoms will disappear.

I approve of your method because it is best to always try to save a person and to change their evil purpose before exposing it, but you will not succeed, as I have not. Spofford has at my suggestions of pacification asked my husband to forgive him, and then gone right away and committed further wrongs, told more falsehoods, and denied that he ever sought his pardon. He has on his knees implored me to forgive him and yet I knew he was no better at heart when he did this.

You have no conception of his terrible character, the only hope is, he is a coward knowing this of himself, and if you can make him know we will expose him through in justice to our cause and professions as Scientists; it may obtain a cessation for us; but he must be put down or we shall be. I will receive the umpire at my house or at yours, but in no other place would it be best

I hope to see you all soon Love to all

And I am ever Respect'lyExpanded:Respectfully Yours
M B Glover Eddy