Accession: L05662
Editorial Title: Mary Baker Eddy to Caroline M. Poor, March 5, 1883
Author: Mary Baker Eddy 
Recipient: Caroline M. Poor 
Date: March 5, 1883
Manuscript Description: Handwritten by Mary Baker Eddy on lined Massachusetts Metaphysical College stationery from Boston, Massachusetts.
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L05662
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Reproduced from the archive of The Mary Baker Eddy Library

You cannot fail to remember that when Mrs. Dunshee refused to give me any reason (because she knew she had none) for taking herself away from truth and Christianity in the course she pursued As Written: persued ; that you said, if ever you had any cause for so doing you would tell me of it. Have you done so? If Jesus was here in person he would say of you all — "they know not what they doLuke 23:33 And when they were come to the place, which is called Calvary, there they crucified him, and the malefactors, one on the right hand, and the other on the left. Luke 23:34 ¶Then said Jesus, Father, forgive them; for they know not what they do. And they parted his raiment, and cast lots. "

I for one, am glad to have you all go in the way your natures tend, if indeed those natures have not been changed after all I have taught you of Truth and Love, and have waited for its fruits in your lives

I hear the insinuations from Mrs. Fifield in regard to Mrs. Whiting who if she was hereEditorial Note: Abbie K. Whiting died on January 22, 1883. would contradict them herself.

This is the truth in relation to her history as I hold myself able to prove and shall call upon those who dare deny it to support their false assertions. After I took Mrs. W. into my class I found she had an incipient consumptionEditorial Note: Consumption is known today as tuberculosis., and would chemicalizeEditorial Note: This refers to “chemicalization,” a term Mary Baker Eddy used to a temporary stirring up of symptoms or process of “fermentation” as errors of various types are being destroyed. too much to study: I then got her to leave the class, at first she felt badly to do it, but afterwards thanked me for it. I next took her to teach after a general improvement As Written: improvemt that she said she owed to me.

When weEditorial Note: Mary Baker Eddy and Asa Gilbert Eddy left for Washington she was well as she said. When we returned after about two months she had what she feared were ulcers on the lungs

I talked her out of that and her cough got well but the only way she helped her cough was to take up the effects of mesmerism. After the death of my husband she was not quite as well but had no cough until I had been gone through the summerEditorial Note: Mary Baker Eddy spent part of the summer of 1882 in Barton, Vermont, following the death of Asa Gilbert Eddy on June 3, 1882., then it returned, and she told me and wrote me that it was caused by her friends constantly frightening her, telling her to go away from the College or she would die. We all understand the effect of that. My girl will tell you that she found her constantly weeping over the letters she got, and that Mrs. W. told her she should be well if they would let her alone

I have no doubt if she had stayed As Written: staid here and my students done for all they could, that she would be living today. Not that I blame Mrs. Fifield, I do not, for she did all she could. Now I have Mrs. Whitings letters to me in which she expresses a longing to return to me "my atmosphere" as she wrote, and bitterly alludes to things where she was regarding her treatment. She also begged of me to keep her roomEditorial Note: Abbie K. Whiting had been renting a room in the Massachusetts Metaphysical College. for her and I did, although I had written to ask her if I would pay her rent for her furniture if I might not rent the room? When I got her reply saying "I should feel so badly to give it up" I dismissed As Written: dimissed the applicant and kept her room until she left SalemEditorial Note: Salem, Massachusetts. The pay I then took for the room was not a third of the value of the rent of the room. I took at her parents own price the carpet, some chairs, (cane seated As Written: seatted ) and a bed stead all of which I could have got at auction for less than half the rent. When she left to go to Salem I gave her a five dollar billEditorial Note: $5.00 in 1883 is the equivalent of $130.59 in 2016. She kissed me at parting and her last words were "I hope to live long enough to reward you for all you have done for me"

Mrs. Whiting left no money or personal property to me or to any one in the College to my knowledge My respects to your honest husbandEditorial Note: George Poor as he seems the only one in your family who can stand the effects of mesmerism

L05662
-
Reproduced from the archive of The Mary Baker Eddy Library

You cannot fail to remember that when Mrs. Dunshee refused to give me any reason (because she knew she had none) for taking herself away from truth and Christianity in the course she persued Corrected: pursued ; that you said, if ever you had any cause for so doing you would tell me of it. Have you done so? If Jesus was here in person he would say of you all — "they know not what they doLuke 23:33 And when they were come to the place, which is called Calvary, there they crucified him, and the malefactors, one on the right hand, and the other on the left. Luke 23:34 ¶Then said Jesus, Father, forgive them; for they know not what they do. And they parted his raiment, and cast lots. "

I for one, am glad to have you all go in the way your natures tend, if indeed those natures have not been changed after all I have taught you of Truth and Love, and have waited for its fruits in your lives

I hear the insinuations from Mrs. Fifield in regard to Mrs. Whiting who if she was hereEditorial Note: Abbie K. Whiting died on January 22, 1883. would contradict them herself.

This is the truth in relation to her history as I hold myself able to prove and shall call upon those who dare deny it to support their false assertions. After I took Mrs. W. into my class I found she had an incipient consumptionEditorial Note: Consumption is known today as tuberculosis., and would chemicalizeEditorial Note: This refers to “chemicalization,” a term Mary Baker Eddy used to a temporary stirring up of symptoms or process of “fermentation” as errors of various types are being destroyed. too much to study: I then got her to leave the class, at first she felt badly to do it, but afterwards thanked me for it. I next took her to teach after a [?]  Unclear or illegible  general improvemt Corrected: improvement that she said she owed to me.

When weEditorial Note: Mary Baker Eddy and Asa Gilbert Eddy left for Washington she was well as she said. When we returned after about two months she had what she feared were ulcers on the lungs

I talked her out of that and her cough got well but Tthe only way she helped her cough was to take up the effects of mesmerism. After the death of my husband she was not quite as well but had no cough until I had been gone through the summerEditorial Note: Mary Baker Eddy spent part of the summer of 1882 in Barton, Vermont, following the death of Asa Gilbert Eddy on June 3, 1882., then it returned, and she told me and wrote me that it was caused by her friends constantly frightening her, telling her to go away from the College or she would die. We all understand the effect of that. My girl will tell you that she found her constantly weeping over the letters she got, and that Mrs. W. told her she should be well if they would let her alone

I have no doubt if she had staid Corrected: stayed here and my students done for all they could, that she would be living today. Not that I blame Mrs. Fifield, I do not, for she did all she could. Now I have Mrs. Whitings letters to me in which she expresses a longing to return to me "my atmosphere" as she wrote, and bitterly alludes to things where she was regarding her treatment. She also begged of me to keep her roomEditorial Note: Abbie K. Whiting had been renting a room in the Massachusetts Metaphysical College. for her and I did, although I had written to ask her if I would pay her rent for her furniture if I might not rent the room? When I got her reply saying "I should feel so badly to give it up" I dimissed Corrected: dismissed the applicant and kept her room until she left SalemEditorial Note: Salem, Massachusetts. The pay I then took for the room was not a third of the value of the rent of the room. I took at her parents own price the carpet, some chairs, (cane seatted Corrected: seated ) un me and a bed stead all of which I could have got at auction for less than half the rent. When she left to go to Salem I gave her a five dollar billEditorial Note: $5.00 in 1883 is the equivalent of $130.59 in 2016. and She kissed me at parting and her last words were "I hope to live long enough to reward you for all you have done for me"

Mrs. Whiting left no money or personal property to me or to any one in the College to my knowledge My respects to your honest husbandEditorial Note: George Poor as he seems the only one in your family who can stand the effects of mesmerism

 
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Abbie K. Whiting died on January 22, 1883. Consumption is known today as tuberculosis. This refers to “chemicalization,” a term Mary Baker Eddy used to a temporary stirring up of symptoms or process of “fermentation” as errors of various types are being destroyed. Mary Baker Eddy and Asa Gilbert Eddy Mary Baker Eddy spent part of the summer of 1882 in Barton, Vermont, following the death of Asa Gilbert Eddy on June 3, 1882. Abbie K. Whiting had been renting a room in the Massachusetts Metaphysical College. Salem, Massachusetts $5.00 in 1883 is the equivalent of $130.59 in 2016. George Poor