Accession: L16971
Editorial Title: Henrietta E. Day to Mary Baker Eddy, October 16, 1881
Author: Henrietta E. Day 
Recipient: Mary Baker Eddy 
Date: October 16, 1881
Manuscript Description: Handwritten in ink by Mrs. H. E. Day on lined paper.
Archival Note: This document is a transcription of 488.55.007.
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L16971
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My dear Teacher.

Your kind, and inspiriting letter reached me last night I obeyed orders instantly, went round to the above number and will take possession of a very pleasant back parlor there tomorrow afternoon. I think this locality, and the arrangements I have made in connection with it, will be satisfactory to you and I trust that you will call there when in “Boston”, as your entire approval is essential to my peace of mind. Acting under your advice I shall not insert any advertisements of any description in any paper, and I have also taken down my outside sign and packed that in my trunk for future reference, and shall rely solely upon the quiet circulation of my “business cards,” among the few friends and acquaintances that I have in this large City determined to fight it out on “this line all winter,”Editorial Note: This is likely an allusion to the May 1864 Ulysses S. Grant quote, "I propose to fight it out on this line if it takes all summer." or longer, as our “Leader” commands. “Mrs. Stackpole” called to see me yesterday afternoon, and we had a long & very interesting discussion about “Metaphysics.” I think that she will send me a patient when the opportunity occurs. “Mr. Choate” has also just called here. He reports his wife as having been successful in turning “Arnes” out of a second boarding place, which he will be forced to vacate tomorrow. I mentioned to him what you had written in your letter as regards “Mrs. Choate,” and I think when she has a patient that she can spare in the suburbs that she will very probably send me one. Meanwhile, as all Professions have to labor, and to wait, to attain practice I shall quietly bide my time, Studying science, and fighting mesmerism ever day, preparing to take hold of any sum as it may present itself and wrestle with it on scientific principles. It is a satisfaction to me to know that you have decided that I am to remain for the present “under the droppings of the Sanctuary.” Probably in time to come, I may be better able to cope with “the world, the flesh, and the devil of error, than now when so newly fledged. Besides, it is a great privilege to meet your gracious presence, and listen to that voice, “speaking as never woman spake before,” the still, small voice of “Truth,” leading us in those appointed paths. “This is the way walk ye in it.”

Very gratefully.

Your Student.
Mrs. H. E. Day.
L16971
-
My dear Teacher.

Your kind, and inspiriting letter reached me last night I obeyed orders instantly, went round to the above number and will take possession of a very pleasant back parlor there tomorrow afternoon. I think this locality, and the arrangements I have made in connection with it, will be satisfactory to you and I trust that you will call there when in “Boston”, as your entire approval is essential to my peace of mind. Acting under your advice I shall not insert any advertisements of any description in any paper, and I have also taken down my outside sign and packed that in my trunk for future reference, and shall rely solely upon the quiet circulation of my “business cards,” among the few friends and acquaintances that I have in this large City determined to fight it out on “this line all winter,”Editorial Note: This is likely an allusion to the May 1864 Ulysses S. Grant quote, "I propose to fight it out on this line if it takes all summer." or longer, as our “Leader” commands. “Mrs. Stackpole” called to see me yesterday afternoon, and we had a long & very interesting discussion about “Metaphysics.” I think that she will send me a patient when the opportunity occurs. “Mr. Choate” has also just called here. He reports his wife as having been successful in turning “Arnes” out of a second boarding place, which he will be forced to vacate tomorrow. I mentioned to him what you had written in your letter as regards “Mrs. Choate,” and I think when she has a patient that she can spare in the suburbs that she will very probably send me one. Meanwhile, as all Professions have to labor, and to wait, to attain practice I shall quietly bide my time, Studying science, and fighting mesmerism ever day, preparing to take hold of any sum as it may present itself and wrestle with it on scientific principles. It is a satisfaction to me to know that you have decided that I am to remain for the present “under the droppings of the Sanctuary.” Probably in time to come, I may be better able to cope with “the world, the flesh, and the devil of error, than now when so newly fledged. Besides, it is a great privilege to meet your gracious presence, and listen to that voice, “speaking as never woman spake before,” the still, small voice of “Truth,” leading us in those appointed paths. “This is the way walk ye in it.”

Very gratefully.

Your Student.
Mrs. H. E. Day.