Accession: L02497
Editorial Title: Mary Baker Eddy to Clara E. Choate, February 23, 1882
Author: Mary Baker Eddy 
Recipient: Clara E. Choate 
Date: February 23, 1882 - archivist estimate
Manuscript Description: Handwritten by Mary Baker Eddy on lined paper.
Related Topic: L12625Click link to view L12625 document in new window, 226.37.003Click link to view 226.37.003 document in new window
Editorial Note: This letter was sent during Mary Baker Eddy's trip to Washington, D.C., and Philadelphia, Pennsylvania.
Final Edits
Original Document

L02497
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My very dear Student

Like the chime of vintage bells to the peasants on the Rhine is your soulful As Written: soulfull letters. You are a good girl and nothing rejoices me more than to hear of your taking classesEditorial Note: Clara E. Choate had been accepting students for class instruction in Christian Science.. So much need there is of enlightening the world and all must reverence in their hearts this grand glorious ScienceEditorial Note: Christian Science even if they depart from it ― who gain even a partial understanding of it.

I am expecting every moment a call from a lady who has presided at the White HouseEditorial Note: Fanny Potter was the niece of President Franklin Pierce and she was one of several women who filled in as hostess for his wife, Jane Pierce, who was often ill or indisposed. Their son Benny had been killed in a train wreck just prior to Franklin Pierce's inauguration and Jane Pierce struggled with the loss. and done the offices faithfully that our nation owns as highest in the world of fashion and festivity. She has called on me twice Now please say not one word of this to even husband, mother or friend. I wanted to tell you and have done so. Give yourself no anxiety about your mail Washington is the handsomest city except Paris in the world Those who have seen and traveled As Written: travelled through all the principal cities in Europe and America tell me so My front parlor commands the most magnificent view of the entire Capitol and grounds. Have visited the Botanical gardens and Smithsonian Institute. To-day I go into the Capitol by invitation Have a number of things to tell you when we meet. I wrote Mrs. Whiting and Mrs. Fifield when I wrote you but had not stamps on the envelopes and the DrEditorial Note: Asa Gilbert Eddy. Eddy did not have a medical degree, but in the nineteenth century, persons engaged in various “healing arts” were often called “doctor.” took them to the office to mail, he might have forgotten to put stamps on the envelopes and so they not have received them. Please say to them this when you see them. Give my love to your husband and mother I hope your husband will remain with you and do well and I know he will if only he holds sufficient guard against the "Demons"Editorial Note: Evidence suggests that George D. Choate suffered from recurrent bouts with alcoholism, and Mary Baker Eddy believed his relapses to be at least partially caused by mental malpractice. (See L12625.) He also lived apart from his wife and son, Warren Choate, at times. I shall be most happy to be given a grand reception by my faithful student one of whom I can almost be proud My dear husband sends love to you all and I am grateful to you for your noble efforts; keep on and we can conquer

Lovingly Thine
M B G E

P. S. Love to Mrs W―gEditorial Note: likely Abbie K. Whiting Those enemies are doing themselves great harm Poetry good

Love to dearest Alice

L02497
-
My very dear Student

Like the chime of vintage bells to the peasants on the Rhine is your soulfull Corrected: soulful letters. You are a good girl and nothing rejoices me more than to hear of your taking classesEditorial Note: Clara E. Choate had been accepting students for class instruction in Christian Science.. So much need there is of enlightening the world and all must reverence in their hearts this grand glorious ScienceEditorial Note: Christian Science even if they depart from it ― who gain even a partial understanding of it.

I am expecting every moment a call from a lady who has presided at the White HouseEditorial Note: Fanny Potter was the niece of President Franklin Pierce and she was one of several women who filled in as hostess for his wife, Jane Pierce, who was often ill or indisposed. Their son Benny had been killed in a train wreck just prior to Franklin Pierce's inauguration and Jane Pierce struggled with the loss. and done the offices faithfully that our nation owns as highest in the world of fashion and festivity. She has called on me twice Now please say not one word of this to even husband, mother or friend. I wanted to tell you and have done so. Give yourself no anxiety about your mail Washington is the handsomest city except Paris in the world Those who have seen and travelled Corrected: traveled through all the principal cities in Europe and America tell me so My front parlor commands the most magnificent view of the entire Capitol and grounds. Have visited the Botanical gardens and Smithsonian Institute. To-day I go into the Capitol by invitation Have a number of things to tell you when I we meet. I wrote Mrs. Whiting and Mrs. Fifield when I wrote you but had not stamps on the envelopes and the DrEditorial Note: Asa Gilbert Eddy. Eddy did not have a medical degree, but in the nineteenth century, persons engaged in various “healing arts” were often called “doctor.” took them to the office to mail, he might have forgotten to put stamps on the envelopes and so they not have received them. Please say to them this when you see them. Give my love to your husband and mother I hope your husband will remain with you and do well and I know he will if only he holds sufficient guard against the "Demons"Editorial Note: Evidence suggests that George D. Choate suffered from recurrent bouts with alcoholism, and Mary Baker Eddy believed his relapses to be at least partially caused by mental malpractice. (See L12625.) He also lived apart from his wife and son, Warren Choate, at times. I shall be most happy to be given a grand reception by my faithful student one of whom I can almost be proud My dear husband sends love to you all and I am grateful to you for your noble efforts; keep on and we can conquer

Lovingly Thine
M B G E

P. S. Love to Mrs W―gEditorial Note: likely Abbie K. Whiting Those enemies are doing themselves great harm Poetry good

Love to dearest Alice