Accession: L07691
Editorial Title: Mary Baker Eddy to Julia S. Bartlett, July 19, 1882
Author: Mary Baker Eddy 
Recipient: Julia S. Bartlett 
Date: July 19, 1882 - archivist estimate
Manuscript Description: Handwritten by Mary Baker Eddy.
Final Edits
Original Document

L07691
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My darling Student--

Your letterEditorial Note: This letter is not extant. was very welcome and I thank you very much for the good care you take of your College I can’t As Written: cant yet feel much interest in anything of earth. I shall try and eventually succeed in rising from the gloom of my irreparable lossEditorial Note: Mary Baker Eddy’s husband, Asa Gilbert Eddy, died on June 3, 1882., but it must take time Long after I shall smile and appear happy shall I have to struggle alone with my great grief that none shall know if I can hide it I think of you at the fort and always as little, or rather great heroes and pray that my coming shall be a joy and not a sorrow to you I know you will hail it, but O! I hope I shall be more useful to you all than a mourner is apt to be. I shall never forget dear, dear Gilbert his memory is dearer every day but not so sad I think as when I left home. It is beautiful here the hills vales and lakes are lovely but this was his native stateEditorial Note: Vermont and he is not here

The lady companion is very comforting with her merry manners and kind heart I long to see you and dear Mrs W. will enclose As Written: inclose a line to her Has H.Editorial Note: Possibly Hanover P. Smith, who was briefly living at the Massachusetts Metaphysical College during the spring and summer of 1882. gone? And do you hear from him? and what? Are the meetings successful and wont you help dear Mrs Choate in every way that you can and do yourself no harm Write soon and often and I am ever thine

Lovingly
M B G E

Have you heard from Maggie? Expect to start for homeEditorial Note: Mary Baker Eddy returned to Boston on August 6, 1882. one week from next Monday We were three days coming here

Kind regards from Dr.Editorial Note: Arthur T. Buswell did not have a medical degree, but in the nineteenth century, persons practicing various “healing arts” were often called “doctor.” Buswell

L07691
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My darling Student--

Your letterEditorial Note: This letter is not extant. was very welcome and I thank you very much for the good care you take of your College I cant Corrected: can’t yet feel much interest in anything of earth. I shall try and eventually succeed in rising from the gloom of my irreparable lossEditorial Note: Mary Baker Eddy’s husband, Asa Gilbert Eddy, died on June 3, 1882., but it must take time Long after I shall smile and appear happy shall I have to struggle alone with my great grief that none shall know if I can hide it I think of you at the fort and always as little, or rather great heroes and pray that my coming shall be a joy and not a sorrow to you I know you will hail it, but O! I hope I shall be more useful to you all than a mourner is apt to be. I shall never forget dear, dear Gilbert his memory is dearer every day but not so sad I think as when I left home. It is beautiful here the hills vales and lakes are lovely but this was his native stateEditorial Note: Vermont and he is not here

The lady companion is very comforting with her merry manners and kind heart I long to see you and dear Mrs W. will inclose Corrected: enclose a line to her Has H.Editorial Note: Possibly Hanover P. Smith, who was briefly living at the Massachusetts Metaphysical College during the spring and summer of 1882. gone? And do you hear from him? and what? Are the meetings successful and wont you help dear Mrs Choate in every way that you can and do yourself no harm Write soon and often and I am ever thine

Lovingly
M B G E

Have you heard from Maggie? Expect to start for homeEditorial Note: Mary Baker Eddy returned to Boston on August 6, 1882. one week from next Monday We were three days coming here

Kind regards from Dr.Editorial Note: Arthur T. Buswell did not have a medical degree, but in the nineteenth century, persons practicing various “healing arts” were often called “doctor.” Buswell